Guam tests toxic mice to kill invasive snakes - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Guam tests toxic mice to kill invasive snakes

HAGATNA, Guam (AP) - Federal biologists are taking another step toward finding a way to kill invasive brown tree snakes on Guam.

Pacific Daily News reports crews Monday dropped mice filled with mild toxins onto a pair of test sites on Andersen Air force Base.

The mice are packed with 80 milligrams of acetaminophen, which is enough to kill a snake but not a cat unless the feline eats 15 of the mice.

Dogs and pigs would have to eat far more to be affected.

The snakes were accidentally introduced to the island about 60 years ago.

They've caused millions in damages to by creating outages in the Guam Power Authority's electrical grid.

Tiny radios implanted into the mice help track the eradication program's success.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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