Ad campaign attacks teen obesity - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Ad campaign attacks teen obesity

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) -

The ads are impossible to miss or forget.  They show teenagers consuming a lumpy, yellowish, fatty substance from a sugary beverage can.

The Hawaii Department of Health loves it.

The reason?  Because the ads are part of its ‘Rethink your Drink' campaign, designed to make teenagers choose healthier, low or no sugar drinks instead of sugary ones.

"It's wildly successful to have 60% of the youth who saw it say they cut down on their sugary drink consumption" said Project Manager Lola Irvin.

"Because it was so successful we want to re-run the campaign again, so starting this month through January, we'll be running the ads again" noted Director of the Department of Health, Loretta Fuddy.

At a relatively low cost of $300,000 the ads come at a huge value, especially given their effectiveness and reach to teenagers.

"The whole idea of the ad campaign is to really show the kids what they are drinking really just becomes fat.  It's not something that your body is going to use, it's not very helpful.  It's just empty calories" said Island Pacific Academy Junior Tullie St. John.

To watch the spots, just click on the following links.

http://vimeo.com/73164839

http://vimeo.com/73164840

Copyright 2013 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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