EXCLUSIVE: Convicted thief's nasty apology - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

EXCLUSIVE: Convicted thief's nasty apology

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) -

He wrote a threatening apology that added nine years to his jail sentence.

But 21-year-old Noah Perkins might be leaving Halawa prison after serving just eight months thanks to a recent ruling by an appellate court earlier.

Back in 2011, Perkins pleaded guilty to burglary and terroristic threatening charges and as part of a deal in which he was supposed to write a letter of apology to his victims.

Instead, what the victims got were threats.

"Let me start this letter by saying that I'm not sorry for what I did to your family ... but I have to write this letter because I was told by the judge," Perkins said.

"Let me tell you that I knew that you're full of s**t and that I'm not feeling sorry for you at all."

According to an arrest warrant, Perkins stole a television and a gaming console from a Hawaii Kai family that taken him in.

He was also accused of threatening his father and brother and taking another gaming console from them.

The letter prompted Circuit Judge Randal Lee to revoke Perkins' probation and issue a new sentence: ten years in prison.

"What the court finds troubling is that you cannot undo a letter," Lee wrote in his ruling.

But earlier this month, the Intermediate Court of Appeals overturned that sentence, saying Perkins' letter was not an violation of his probation terms.

The ruling means that Perkins can be released from Halawa in less than two months.

State Sen. Sam Slom says the ICA should not have overturned the sentence since Perkins poses a potential threat to his victims.

"If the ICA dismisses this penalty and something later happens, it's going to be on their heads," Slom said.

"It was the tenor and the tone and the threats in this letter ... He has flaunted the court. He had an opportunity for a plea deal, which again rankles the public and he muffed it."

But others think that ten-year sentence is too much.

"We don't want this individual in prison when he is 31 years old, 41 years old, 51 years old," said state Sen. Will Espero, D-Waipahu.

"We want to make sure he is punished for the crimes he has committed while at the same time see where we can help him while he is in our custody."

In his letter, Perkins didn't confine his anger to his crime victims.

"I hate the USA, and the Feds but I have to play by the rules for now and when I get off probation, I will make the American people pay, mark my words, you can take this letter and shove it up your a**," he said.

"Thank you for giving your TV and your son's PS3. I'll see you around."

Perkins signed his letter with an expletive and his given name in Russia, where he was born.

Perkins has since written a separate letter expressing his remorse. A friend of his family says he also regrets writing the original letter.

Copyright 2013 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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