Recognizing a Concussion - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Recognizing a Concussion

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(Hawaii News Now) - With Hawaii's year-round good weather, thousands of youth and other are involved with sports activities, increasing the chance that they will be exposed to a potentially serious brain injury. Seeing stars, experiencing numbness or losing consciousness – if only for a second – are signs of a potentially dangerous concussion.
 
Although football generally receives the most attention when it comes to concussions, athletes of nearly any sport can sustain a head injury. Properly recognizing the symptoms of head trauma and receiving timely treatment decreases the chances of lasting damage resulting from a hard hit.

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