Kauai woman arrested following crash and altercation - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Kauai woman arrested following crash and altercation

Velvet Puulei Velvet Puulei
HANAMAULU, KAUAI (HawaiiNewsNow) -

A 24-year-old Hanamaulu woman was arrested Wednesday afternoon following a series of events that began with a car crash in Hanamaulu.

According to Kauai County officials, at approximately 1:20 p.m., Velvet Puulei was driving her Nissan SUV along Palikea Street when her vehicle crashed into an unattended parked car along the eastbound lane. Her vehicle then veered across the roadway and slammed into a parked pickup truck.

Puulei's SUV came to a stop following the second collision, when she ran out of her vehicle and into a neighboring home on Palikea Street.

She proceeded to get into a verbal altercation with a 21-year-old female occupant of the home. The fight turned physical and Puulei allegedly punched the woman in the face.

Officers responded to the scene and attempted to place Puulei under arrest but Puulei physically resisted the arresting officer, which resulted in damages to the police vehicle.

Puulei was eventually apprehended and transported to Wilcox Hospital for a medical examination. Following medical clearance from the hospital, Puulei was then taken to Police Cellblock where she remains in lieu of $5,500 bail.

She was arrested on multiple charges relating to assault, harassment, burglary, criminal property damage, resisting arrest and driving without a license or insurance.

Traffic on Palikea Street was halted for roughly 30 minutes to allow damaged vehicles to be towed from the scene.

Copyright 2012 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

  • Hawaii News Now headlinesNewsMore>>

  • UN: Excessive drinking killed over 3 million people in 2016

    UN: Excessive drinking killed over 3 million people in 2016

    Saturday, September 22 2018 2:20 PM EDT2018-09-22 18:20:51 GMT
    Monday, September 24 2018 8:02 PM EDT2018-09-25 00:02:14 GMT
    (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan, FILE). FILE- In this Nov. 27, 2012 file photo, a customer checks bottles of imported wine at a supermarket in Beijing. The World Health Organization said in a report published Friday Sept. 21, 2018,  that drinking too much ...(AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan, FILE). FILE- In this Nov. 27, 2012 file photo, a customer checks bottles of imported wine at a supermarket in Beijing. The World Health Organization said in a report published Friday Sept. 21, 2018, that drinking too much ...
    The World Health Organization says that drinking too much alcohol killed more than 3 million people in 2016, mostly men.More >>
    The World Health Organization says that drinking too much alcohol killed more than 3 million people in 2016, mostly men.More >>
  • Hawaii 'worst state' for teachers, and not just because of low pay

    Hawaii 'worst state' for teachers, and not just because of low pay

    Monday, September 24 2018 8:01 PM EDT2018-09-25 00:01:05 GMT
    Some 12,000 teachers are employed in Hawaii's public schools. (Image: Hawaii News Now/File)Some 12,000 teachers are employed in Hawaii's public schools. (Image: Hawaii News Now/File)

    Hawaii is the worst state in the nation for teachers. 

    More >>

    Hawaii is the worst state in the nation for teachers. 

    More >>
  • Bye bye bugs? Scientists fear non-pest insects are declining

    Bye bye bugs? Scientists fear non-pest insects are declining

    Thursday, September 20 2018 1:19 AM EDT2018-09-20 05:19:36 GMT
    Monday, September 24 2018 7:55 PM EDT2018-09-24 23:55:46 GMT
    (AP Photo/Don Ryan). FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States a...(AP Photo/Don Ryan). FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States a...

    Scientists are noticing fewer and fewer moths, ladybugs, fireflies and butterflies, but they can't quite quantify what's happening to flying insects because they never measured how many bugs there used to be.

    More >>

    Scientists are noticing fewer and fewer moths, ladybugs, fireflies and butterflies, but they can't quite quantify what's happening to flying insects because they never measured how many bugs there used to be.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly