Small Ball gets it done for Rainbows - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Small Ball gets it done for Rainbows

HONOLULU -The Rainbows baseball team proved that ‘small ball' is just as effective as power baseball.  Mike Trapasso's club executed impressively in the series finale against San Francisco Sunday, taking a 3-2 decision at Les Murakami Stadium for the 3-1 series win.

The Rainbows got on the scoreboard in the first inning when Zack Swasey's ground ball got through the left side of the infield, scoring Stephen Ventimilia.  The play was ruled a fielding error, preventing Swasey from picking up the RBI.  Later in the first, Pi'ikea Kitamura sent a high chopper to third which allowed Collin Bennett to score, making the score 2-0 after the first.

The Dons tied the score in the 4th, but the Rainbows retook the lead an inning later when Swasey slapped a ball to the right side of the infield.  The Fielder's Choice allowed Ventimilia to score his second run of the game.

In the meantime, UH's pitching did just enough to get the win. 

Jon Flinn, making his second start of the season, worked four innings, surrendering only two runs on four hits.

Relievers Lawrence Chew and Jesse Moore picked him up, combining to throw five scoreless innings to close out the game.

The Rainbows improved to 14-7 on the season.  They now embark on their first road trip of the campaign, beginning with a single game against Portland on Tuesday.  They will follow that with a four-game series against Gonzaga in Spokane, Washington.

 

Copyright 2012 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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