Police expect public to obey fireworks ban - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Police expect public to obey fireworks ban

Quinton Petersen Quinton Petersen
Debbie Kumai Debbie Kumai
Capt. Terry Seelig Capt. Terry Seelig

By Jim Mendoza - bio | email

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - Behind the brightly colored banners at Pacific Fireworks street side stand, even the proprietor is disappointed at the merchandise he has to offer.

"There's no fountains," Bret Lukens said. "There's nothing they can really enjoy. No color. It's just all firecrackers."

This will be the first New Year's under Oahu's new law that bans setting off sparklers, fountains and other fireworks.

"It's ridiculous," Waimalu resident Quinton Petersen said.

Violations range from a petty misdemeanor to a Class B felony. There will be more cops on patrol. But some people wonder how effective Honolulu police will be in catching fireworks felons red handed.

"It's going to be everywhere," said Minnie Souza of Makakilo.

Under the ordinance, fines range from $200 to $1,000 with up to 30 days in jail.

An HPD spokesperson said police will enforce the law "when appropriate" and respond to complaints of fireworks violations. The new law now makes it illegal for minors to set off firecrackers.

"They should have asked the people instead of just making a decision on their own," Waialua resident Carla Notebo said.

"There's a lot of kids in this neighborhood," Petersen said. "For fireworks to be banned, it's taking away from them."

"They can take them to the shows and see the fireworks there," said Debbie Kumai of Pearl City.

Police and fire officials want the public's cooperation, and expect most people to obey the fireworks law.

"We would expect, if people obey the ordinance and do the right thing in terms of what is legal, that it will be a quiet New Year's," fire Capt. Terry Seelig said.

Firecrackers can be set off between 9 p.m. New Year's Eve and 1 a.m. New Year's Day.

Copyright 2011 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved

  • Hawaii News Now headlinesNewsMore>>

  • Shame, fear: Survivors explain not reporting sexual assaults

    Shame, fear: Survivors explain not reporting sexual assaults

    Friday, September 21 2018 6:20 PM EDT2018-09-21 22:20:29 GMT
    Saturday, September 22 2018 11:15 AM EDT2018-09-22 15:15:56 GMT
    (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File). FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2018 file photo, President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington for the third day of his confirmation ...(AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File). FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2018 file photo, President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington for the third day of his confirmation ...
    Survivors respond with fury to Trump's remarks on woman who accused court nominee of sexual assault.More >>
    Survivors respond with fury to Trump's remarks on woman who accused court nominee of sexual assault.More >>
  • Study of puzzling fossils confirms they came from an animal

    Study of puzzling fossils confirms they came from an animal

    Thursday, September 20 2018 2:18 PM EDT2018-09-20 18:18:23 GMT
    Saturday, September 22 2018 10:55 AM EDT2018-09-22 14:55:56 GMT
    (Ilya Bobrovskiy/Australian National University via AP). This undated photo provided by Ilya Bobrovskiy in September 2018 shows a Dickinsonia fossil from the White Sea area of Russia. The body is about 9 centimeters (3.5 inches) long. In a report relea...(Ilya Bobrovskiy/Australian National University via AP). This undated photo provided by Ilya Bobrovskiy in September 2018 shows a Dickinsonia fossil from the White Sea area of Russia. The body is about 9 centimeters (3.5 inches) long. In a report relea...
    Scientists say puzzling fossils from more than 500 million years ago are traces of an animal.More >>
    Scientists say puzzling fossils from more than 500 million years ago are traces of an animal.More >>
  • Bye bye bugs? Scientists fear non-pest insects are declining

    Bye bye bugs? Scientists fear non-pest insects are declining

    Thursday, September 20 2018 1:19 AM EDT2018-09-20 05:19:36 GMT
    Saturday, September 22 2018 10:55 AM EDT2018-09-22 14:55:53 GMT
    (AP Photo/Don Ryan). FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States a...(AP Photo/Don Ryan). FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States a...

    Scientists are noticing fewer and fewer moths, ladybugs, fireflies and butterflies, but they can't quite quantify what's happening to flying insects because they never measured how many bugs there used to be.

    More >>

    Scientists are noticing fewer and fewer moths, ladybugs, fireflies and butterflies, but they can't quite quantify what's happening to flying insects because they never measured how many bugs there used to be.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly