Point shaving allegation gets national attention - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Point shaving allegation gets national attention

Hawaii Pacific University Communications Department chair John Hart Hawaii Pacific University Communications Department chair John Hart

By Brooks Baehr - bio | email

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) – The anonymous allegation players on the University of Hawaii football team have engaged in point shaving was the talk of the town in Honolulu Wednesday and was reported by newspapers, radio stations, and web based news outlets across the nation.

"The hot button topic that everybody is talking about has to do with this alleged point shaving story that came out yesterday afternoon," said host Josh Pacheco during his noon-time radio show on ESPN 1420.

Pacheco's listeners called the show to voice their thoughts.

"I don't even know why the thing even came out. Anybody could have sent a letter. I could have sent a letter today. You can send a letter tomorrow. It's like, big deal," one man said.

Another added, "From what I've been hearing from the buzz around town is that it's a done deal and that people think that it is true."

Colin Cowherd, a host for ESPN Radio who is heard in cities across the nation, discussed the story on the air Wednesday.

"There have been money bets against Hawaii that have moved the line three or more points four times this year. The big money betters have won three and lost none. So there is a point shaving allegation with Hawaii football," Cowherd said.

(Cowherd also said UH players had told university police about teammates involved in point shaving. There is no information from the university or players to support that claim.)

National television sports news programs have not covered the story yet, but the allegation of point shaving at UH is all over the Internet. A simple search of the words "point shaving Hawaii" produces dozens of reports by a wide variety of web-based news outlets.

"A lot of that is timing. You know with the Penn State scandal if you are a football program, now is not the time to have any accusations," said Hawaii Pacific University Communications Department chair John Hart referring to the sex abuse scandal involving an assistant football coach at Penn State.

Hart believes U.H. has done a good job of handling a bad situation. How much worse it gets, he said, depends on how long the story lingers.

"It's got publicity. Certainly no program likes negative publicity, but if this is all there is, I'm not sure how many more legs this story has," he concluded.

The Honolulu Police Department reiterated Wednesday it does not have enough information to open a criminal investigation, but could in the future if it gets more evidence of wrongdoing.

Copyright 2011 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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