Kamehameha Schools names new Head of School for Kapalama - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Kamehameha Schools names new Head of School for Kapalama

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - Kamehameha Schools has named Earl T. Kim as the new Head of School for Kamehameha Schools' Kapalama campus.

"I am pleased to announce that Earl Kim has accepted my invitation to join the Kamehameha Schools ‘ohana as our new Po'o Kula – Head of School – for the Kapâlama campus," said CEO Dee Jay Mailer.

Kim is currently Superintendent of Schools for the Montgomery school district of New Jersey. He will become Kapalama's Head of School on July 1, 2012, succeeding Michael J. Chun, who announced his retirement effective June 30, 2012.

"Overwhelmed and deeply humbled," said Kim. "I have always known that this is what I was supposed to do with my adult life. This is something deeper than just taking responsibility for a school. It is taking responsibility for continuing the good work of Dr. Chun and the others who came before him, and for advancing the values and vision of Princess Pauahi on behalf of our children. This is stewardship of something sacred, and I can think of no higher purpose in life."

Kim was born and raised in Hawaii and is a 1980 graduate of Iolani School. He received his BA from Cornell University and his Masters in Public Affairs, Domestic Policy Analysis from Princeton University. He was selected from three finalists.

"In my meetings and conversations with Earl, and through my review of his experience and references, I find a man who brings impressive experience and achievement in leading and managing large educational systems to excellence," said CEO Mailer.

Kim and his wife, Kit, have two children, ages 14 and 18.

 

Copyright 2011 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved

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