APEC: What happens in Hawaii does not stay in Hawaii - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

APEC: What happens in Hawaii does not stay in Hawaii

Foreign journalists have been coming to Hawaii ahead of November's APEC summit. Foreign journalists have been coming to Hawaii ahead of November's APEC summit.
Kibong Kim Kibong Kim
A hospital bed that detects patients' heart rate and respiration A hospital bed that detects patients' heart rate and respiration
Patrick Sullivan Patrick Sullivan

By Teri Okita – bio | email

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - Foreign journalists have been coming to Hawaii ahead of November's APEC summit.

They're interested in our best and brightest ideas for renewable energy, health, science and technology. We talked to some reporters from South Korea today - to get their thoughts on how Hawaii's innovations can be used overseas.

Kibong Kim reports for YTN TV, South Korea's 24 hour newschannel. He and a handful of other Korean journalists are spending four days in Hawaii. What they absorb here will be read and watched by millions of people - thousands of miles away.

They're learning about new inventions created right here in the islands, like a hospital bed that detects patients' heart rate and respiration - without them being hooked up to sensors.

"For your own safety, please return to your bed," says the voice box located next to the bed.

The founder of Ocean-it - a Honolulu-based engineering, science, and technology company - says they want to spread the message that Hawaii is a great place for Asian-Pacific economies to do business.

"APEC is the beginning of the journey, but it's not the end of the journey," explains Ocean-it's Patrick Sullivan. "And, the beginning of the journey's about developing relations and how they see Hawaii and how we can address the things that they need."

Reporter Kim says he used to think of our islands as just a travel destination, but after learning about everything from cancer research to astronomy to bio-fuels, he'll be reporting on a array of subjects when he returns to Korea.

"The renewable energy, the clean energy, is a topic that is of concern on the international level and then, coming here and seeing how that's being done in Hawaii and Hawaii leading the way, that's very impressive," says Kim.

While many are focusing on the emerging China market, South Korea remains a viable, strong business partner here because of its advanced manufacturing and democratic structure.

21 member countries or "economies", as they're called, belong to APEC, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. Organizers expect about 20 thousand dignitaries and diplomats – and their entourages - to be here the second week of November.

 

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