Impatient with the state, man acts on his own to have log ... - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Impatient with the state, man acts on his own to have log removed at Sandy Beach

A large log washed up at Sandy Beach on Tuesday A large log washed up at Sandy Beach on Tuesday
Robin Bond, Jr. Robin Bond, Jr.
A crane from Advanced Towing company came out and pulled the log out of the water. A crane from Advanced Towing company came out and pulled the log out of the water.
The log currently sits roadside, stationary on land, away from the water. The log currently sits roadside, stationary on land, away from the water.

By Ben Gutierrez - bio | email

SANDY BEACH (HawaiiNewsNow) - When a large log washed up at Sandy Beach Tuesday, Robin Bond, Jr., thought it posed a threat to beachgoers.

"We saw this log on the beach at Sandy Beach," Bond said, "and it wasn't on the section of the beach where people bodysurf, but it was pretty close and there were kids around it, and we thought it would be a good idea to let DLNR know that it had made ground."

The log is more than 40 feet long and weighs an estimated 6,000 pounds.

He called the state Department of Land and Natural Resources to have it removed. But when the DLNR didn't give him the answer he wanted, he decided to act on his own Thursday.

Someone from DLNR came out and took a look to assess the situation. But Ed Underwood, the administrator of the boating and ocean recreation division, said the department didn't have the necessary equipment to remove it. So it went through the process to look for a contractor to do the job.

Bond said kids began to play around the log, and he could wait no longer. He called someone who had the gear to do the job. A crane from Advanced Towing company came out and pulled the log out of the water.

"Everything would be on our shoulders, at least the burden for liability would be on our shoulders, but we were able to get down there and get it out of the water," Bond said.

According to Underwood, because the log was in a rocky area and away from people, it was deemed not to be an imminent danger to the public. However, it acknowledged that it posted a safety risk.

That wasn't good enough for Bond.

"If there is a chance that someone could be killed or seriously hurt by something on the beach, I strongly think that they have a responsibility to act immediately, and not stop acting until they've remedied it," he said.

Bond did not disclose exactly how much he might end up paying, but it's estimated that a job like this one would be worth about $1,200.

The log is now out of the water and no longer poses a danger. But responsibility for the log has changed.

"I got the green light from the DLNR," Bond said, "but what I didn't take into consideration was that by dragging it onto the beach, I removed it from the DLNR and I put it in the hands of the (city) parks department."

The city may be using the log now to block people from taking off-road vehicles onto the beach, but its future is uncertain.

 

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