Water service restored to about 100 homes in Ewa Beach after wat - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Water service restored to about 100 homes in Ewa Beach after water main ruptures

By Minna Sugimoto - bio | email

EWA BEACH (HawaiiNewsNow) -Water is now restored this morning in Ewa Beach.

Residents of about 100 homes in Ewa Beach were relying on alternate sources of water after a pipe in their neighborhood ruptured Sunday afternoon.

Water service couldn't be restored until the repairs are finished. Vondell Cabos filled up a large container at the water wagon just outside her Ewa Beach Road home. Scrambling for water wasn't how she and her family expected to spend their Sunday evening.

"My mom went to go make dinner. She turned on the water and she says, oh, no more water," Cabos said while laughing."

A break in a 12-inch water main was the reason for the service disruption.

"I saw it was a mess down there," Cabos said. "It was all flooded and everything."

The Honolulu Board of Water Supply says it learned about the rupture at about 3 PM, but it took some time to get a crew together to respond to the scene. At 7 PM, repair workers were still excavating and trying to reach the affected pipe.

"No water, no shower tonight," Randy Stirm, Ewa Beach Road resident, said. "So maybe I'll go to my friend's, take a shower and relax for the evening."

By water main standards, the busted line wasn't that old. It reportedly was installed in 1997.

Area residents say the service disruption took some getting used to and gave them a renewed appreciation for water.

"We just went swimming. My husband says, oh, you gonna rinse off? I said, yeah, I'm gonna go on the hose and rinse off. I forgot," Cabos said while laughing.

"I've been through a typhoon in the Philippines. We were without electric and water for three weeks," Stirm said. "Let me tell you it really, after the first few days, it really affects you greatly. You're just like augh."

Board of Water Supply officials say the digging process to get to the broken pipe has been difficult because they're working in an area with a lot of coral. They hope to have the repairs completed and the road re-paved sometime Monday morning.

Copyright 2011 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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