Pest proof fence at Kaena Point almost finished - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Pest proof fence at Kaena Point almost finished

Barbara Bjorkman Barbara Bjorkman
Rachel Davies Rachel Davies

By Brooks Baehr - bio | email

KAENA POINT (HawaiiNewsNow) - Native plants and animals at Kaena Point will soon have protection from pesky predators. Workers are just about finished erecting a quarter million dollar pest proof fence. It will seal off 59 acres of coastal land at the Western most tip of Oahu.

The fence mesh is so fine even small rodents cannot get through. Rats, mongooses, cats, and other predators will not be able to climb over the specially designed hood nor will they be able to slip under the apron at ground level.

A vocal minority has expressed cultural and visual concerns over the fence, but people we found hiking at Kaena Point all approve.

"I think the fence is great. I think that it's a wonderful way to preserve this area and to have the birds come back," said Barbara Bjorkman, a Mililani Resident.

"It doesn't really bother me. I think they make it see through so when I was walking I could still see through," said Rachel Davies of Honolulu.

"I'm definitely for the fence. I like the albatross. I don't want anything to ruin their habitat," added Hickam resident Kyle Thurmond.

The fence is about 95% complete. Once the last stretch of mesh is installed, gates will be added so hikers still have access into the protected area.

The whole idea is to keep predators out so the albatross, monk seals, and other native plants and animals can thrive.

For a good look at the fence watch the video version of this story once it is posted.

Copyright 2011 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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