Defense: woman who killed peacock with baseball bat planned to.. - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Defense: woman who killed peacock with baseball bat planned to eat it for dinner

Sandra Maloney Sandra Maloney
Jane Ebert Jane Ebert
Earle Partington Earle Partington

By Minna Sugimoto - bio | email

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - Trial began Wednesday for a Makaha woman who says she beat a peacock to death because its loud cries caused her to become sleep deprived and depressed.

"What you're going to hear over the next couple of days is going to be about how the defendant, Sandra Maloney, chose to deal with her anger," Andrew Park, deputy prosecutor, said to the jury.

Jurors were shown the baseball bat that was used in the beating, as well as a photo of the dead peacock.

A neighbor testified that she saw Maloney whacking the bird in the barbeque area of their apartment complex in May 2009.

"When this was going on, what were you thinking?" Park asked.

"I was surprised, shocked," Jane Ebert, witness, testified. "I wasn't quite believing what I was seeing."

The defense argues that peafowl are wild birds, and that the state doesn't require a permit to kill them.

"Yes, she got frustrated and decided to kill one and cook it for dinner," Earle Partington, defense attorney, said. "She spent a lot of time on a farm. She was finally going to get a little bit of vengeance if she could on this peacock. She knows how to prepare them."

Maloney is charged with misdemeanor animal cruelty, a crime punishable by up to a year in jail.

The trial continues Thursday.

Copyright 2011 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

  • Hawaii News Now headlinesNewsMore>>

  • In reversal, Trump orders halt to his family separation rule

    In reversal, Trump orders halt to his family separation rule

    Wednesday, June 20 2018 11:21 AM EDT2018-06-20 15:21:21 GMT
    Friday, June 22 2018 3:16 PM EDT2018-06-22 19:16:02 GMT
    A boy stares out of a heavily tinted bus window leaving a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility Tuesday in McAllen, TX. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)A boy stares out of a heavily tinted bus window leaving a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility Tuesday in McAllen, TX. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    Trump signs executive order to keep families together at border, says 'zero-tolerance' prosecution policy will continue.

    More >>

    Trump signs executive order to keep families together at border, says 'zero-tolerance' prosecution policy will continue.

    More >>
  • No clear plan yet on how to reunite parents with children

    No clear plan yet on how to reunite parents with children

    Wednesday, June 20 2018 2:31 AM EDT2018-06-20 06:31:19 GMT
    Friday, June 22 2018 3:09 PM EDT2018-06-22 19:09:35 GMT
    (AP Photo/Eric Gay). A boy stares out of a heavily tinted bus window leaving a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility, Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in McAllen, Texas. More than 2,300 minors have been separated from their families crossing the border to...(AP Photo/Eric Gay). A boy stares out of a heavily tinted bus window leaving a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility, Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in McAllen, Texas. More than 2,300 minors have been separated from their families crossing the border to...
    Trump administration officials have no clear plan on how to reunite some of the 2,300 minors separated from their families at the border as a result of a zero-tolerance policy of criminally prosecuting anyone...More >>
    Trump administration officials have no clear plan on how to reunite some of the 2,300 minors separated from their families at the border as a result of a zero-tolerance policy of criminally prosecuting anyone caught entering the U.S. illegally.More >>
  • High Court: Online shoppers can be forced to pay sales tax

    High Court: Online shoppers can be forced to pay sales tax

    Thursday, June 21 2018 10:32 AM EDT2018-06-21 14:32:03 GMT
    Friday, June 22 2018 3:08 PM EDT2018-06-22 19:08:24 GMT
    (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko, File). FILE - This April 23, 2018, file photo shows the Supreme Court in Washington.  The Supreme Court says states can force online shoppers to pay sales tax. The 5-4 ruling Thursday is a win for states, who said they were lo...(AP Photo/Jessica Gresko, File). FILE - This April 23, 2018, file photo shows the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court says states can force online shoppers to pay sales tax. The 5-4 ruling Thursday is a win for states, who said they were lo...

    The Supreme Court says states can force online shoppers to pay sales tax.

    More >>

    The Supreme Court says states can force online shoppers to pay sales tax.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly