Former football star's accused murderer appears in court... - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Former football star's accused murderer appears in court under tight security

Makuola Collins (in black shirt) in court Makuola Collins (in black shirt) in court
State sheriffs provide security at the hearing State sheriffs provide security at the hearing
Another sheriff provides more security for the hearing Another sheriff provides more security for the hearing
Makuola Collins Makuola Collins
Makuola Collins Makuola Collins

By Minna Sugimoto - bio | email

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - About half a dozen state sheriffs provided extra security Wednesday during the initial court appearance for a man accused in the shooting death of a former Castle High School star quarterback.

Makuola Collins, 26, stood before a District Court judge wearing handcuffs and leg shackles. His family members were present in the courtroom, and declined comment following the brief hearing.

Police say Collins and Leon Botelho, 21, were kicked out of Club Komomai in Kaneohe after getting into a fight early Sunday morning. Collins allegedly followed Botelho and his older brother, Joel, to their parents' house on Waikalua Road and opened fire.

Joel Botelho, 27, took a bullet to the chest and died. His younger brother was not hurt.

According to a police affidavit, Leon Botelho immediately identified the suspect to officers responding to reports of gunfire. He told investigators that he has known Collins since elementary school.

The suspect is charged with second-degree murder, first-degree attempted murder, second-degree attempted murder, three firearms offenses, and two drug offenses. A preliminary hearing will be held Monday, unless an Oahu grand jury indicts him before then.

Collins remains in custody, unable to post $750,000 bail.

 

Copyright 2011 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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