Hawaii will welcome new laws in 2011 - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Hawaii will welcome new laws in 2011

A new law will require a solid, flat surface in animal cages A new law will require a solid, flat surface in animal cages
Keoni Vaughn Keoni Vaughn
A demonstration of the anti-drunk driving ignition interlock system A demonstration of the anti-drunk driving ignition interlock system
New fines will be imposed on bulky trash law offenders New fines will be imposed on bulky trash law offenders
Medical insurers will cover the cost of colon cancer screenings Medical insurers will cover the cost of colon cancer screenings

By Tim Sakahara - bio | email

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - While most animals don't like fireworks they do have reason to celebrate.  A new law will go into effect January 1 designed to prevent animal cruelty. 

The Hawaiian Humane Society would like to think people consider their pets part of the family but that isn't always true which is why the changes beef up the animal cruelty laws.

From canines to cats all pets are included in the new law which states animals must enough room in their housing to stand up, turn around and safely interact with other animals and provide shelter from the elements they must also be kept on a solid, flat surface not the wiring on crates.

"Spending 24 hours a day on a wired platform really wares down the pads of their feet and causes sores so this new law addresses that concern," said Keoni Vaughn, Hawaiian Humane Society.

Vaughn says some big violators are actually pet stores because the wire crates make it easier to clean up after the animal, but now if they're caught it could mean a $2,000 fine and/or a year in jail.

"Here locally about 85 to 90 percent don't do it so they need to make the corrections," said Vaughn.

Animals must also be sent to a licensed veterinarian when they're suffering.  Vaughn says the new law would have meant more violations in previous puppy farm cases, including the one we exposed in Waimanalo earlier this year.

"It would have made a huge difference. Our humane investigators would have been able to mandate veterinary care to prevent suffering," said Vaughn.

Other new laws target drunk drivers requiring them to install an ignition interlock device to make sure they haven't been drinking before starting their car.

Honolulu residents could be fined $250 a day for leaving their bulky trash on the curbside too long.

Meanwhile people could save about $200 because medical insurers will be required to add colon cancer screenings as a covered procedure starting in March.

Other new laws require corporations donating more than $1,000 to a political candidate in a two year election cycle must file a report with the campaign finance commission. 

From now on the primary election date will be on the second Saturday in August.  It was previously held on the second to last Saturday in September.

 

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