Retired car dealer James Pflueger pleads not guilty to tax fraud - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Retired car dealer James Pflueger pleads not guilty to tax fraud

James Pflueger James Pflueger

By Minna Sugimoto - bio | email

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - A retired Hawaii car dealer accused of tax fraud appeared before a US District Court judge in Honolulu and pleaded not guilty Monday.

James Pflueger and his accountant Dennis Duban are two of the five people from Pflueger Incorporated who are charged in a 21-page indictment. Judge Kevin Chang ordered them to surrender their passports and set trial for December.

The indictment alleges that the defendants set up tax shelters in the Cook Islands and Switzerland, and deducted personal expenses as business expenses. Pflueger had no comment as he left the court house.

The attorney for Pflueger's son, Alan, says it was just human error and there's no evidence of deliberate wrongdoing. Alan Pflueger and two company executives are scheduled to enter their pleas on Friday.

Copyright 2010 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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