Chemical odor sickens students, staff members at Highlands... - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Chemical odor sickens students, staff members at Highlands Intermediate

Amy Martinson Amy Martinson

By Minna Sugimoto - bio | email

PEARL CITY (HawaiiNewsNow) - Fourteen students and three adults were treated for dizziness, breathing difficulties and other symptoms after a chemical odor passed through their school Monday.

It happened at Highlands Intermediate in Pearl City at about 1:30 PM. Fire officials say someone at a house nearby was spraying Malathion, an insecticide, at the time.

The school says it immediately implemented its emergency response plan, and moved students into the library, band room and cafeteria.

"We practice shelter in place and other emergency kinds of evacuations," Amy Martinson, principal, said. "You know, practice does make perfect."

The principal, herself, was among those affected.

"If you get too much of it, the fire people told me that you'll get this severe headache, which I got," Martinson said. "Then you might get a little dizzy, which I got."

Two students were taken to a hospital in stable condition. The other patients were treated at the scene

Copyright 2010 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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