Rubbish brings people together...after 12 years - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Rubbish brings people together...after 12 years

Tyler Ogawa Tyler Ogawa

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - Nowadays, they're automatic, but remember when garbage trucks were operated manually, and the workers would hang on the side, jump off, and pick up trash cans by hand?

Well, a toddler from Pauoa loved watching them so much that today, 12 years later, his dad and the city, coordinated a rubbish reunion.

Garrett Ogawa snapped of his 2-year-old son, Tyler, with the heroes in his neighborhood. They were the men who cleaned up his family's rubbish every week.

Sylvia Young, Tyler's grandmother, told us about it, "They would come really early in the morning and he would get up and as soon as he hears the sound, he would run out to the balcony and wait for the truck to pull up in front of our house.

Tyler followed up by saying, "If I didn't come downstairs, they would always ring the doorbell and then ask my parents if I was awake. I just loved getting up in the morning and seeing them. They were so kind to me."

His father, Garrett Ogawa, said, "As the years went by, my son was asking, I wonder what happened to them."

So, Garrett called up the city, asked for a favor, and got it.

Garrett continued, "We didn't expect this to happen."

On Saturday, Tyler, now 14, reunited with the men who were the center of his fascination, back when he was in diapers. They got a chance to talk story and reconnect after all these years. Tyler even stepped up into the driver's seat of the rubbish truck during the reunion. Now he's in high school, with a new dream.

Tyler said, "I want to go to KCC for college to learn about culinary arts." He thinks it's about time to give back to the men who were so nice to him when he was a baby: "I think I would like to cook them hot wings."

Copyright 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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