She rescued a goose and can't shake it loose - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

She rescued a goose and can't shake it loose

Ruth Limtiaco Ruth Limtiaco
Lucy Goosey Lucy Goosey

HAWAII KAI (HawaiiNewsNow) - Hawaii Kai resident Ruth Limtiaco has a new baby, but it's not what you'd expect.

She came across a goose Monday night, flying back and forth on Hawaii Kai Drive where it was causing some traffic issues.

Little did Limtiaco know that when she stopped to shoo the bird off the road, she'd gain a constant companion.

Limtiaco said, "He glued on to me and wouldn't leave me alone. He was bonded on me so we walked home together, which was about three blocks and he toddled right after me. He followed me all the way home."

Now, the two are inseparable! Limtiaco put a pen for the goose, which she named Lucy Goosey, inside her house.

It's got its own spot on the couch and even gets hand-fed, water! Limtiaco tries to get Lucy Goosey to drink by asking, "Are you thirsty? Hmm? Are you thirsty?"

Limtiaco said she hopes to find him a home with other geese in a rural area. She said he's a great pet, but he's messy and needs constant attention, plus he follows her around, even if she leaves the house.

She expressed, "I'm afraid he'll jump back in the marina and go searching for somebody when he's here alone. I mean, I had to go to a meeting last night and I thought he'd be fine. I closed the gate and I slipped away and, this meeting is around the block," said Limtiaco. She continued, "About two hours into the meeting, I hear this honking outside. It's dark. And we all went outside and there he was swimming around back and forth in the middle of the marina."

This clever goose figured out exactly where Limtiaco was!

She recalled, "He swam right over to me, and I picked him up and we walked home together."

Lucy Goosey is now the talk of the neighborhood, but doesn't seem to like a lot of attention. He nibbled at Limtiaco's neighbors, and then actually bit them. "He wants to be right by my side.Yes. Right by my side all the time," said Limtiaco.

Copyright 2010 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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