Changing Aging with Dr. Bill Thomas June 3-10, 2010 - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Changing Aging with Dr. Bill Thomas June 3-10, 2010

Welcome to the new ChangingAging.org weekly blog roundup for June 3-10, 2010.

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Cult of Adulthood

Are You Proud to Go Gray?

The first, most important, and unbreakable rule is that men have no place offering opinions on whether women should or should not "go gray."  -- Dr. Bill Thomas

Still Swinging in the UK

Britain's oldest "swinging" couple is the subject of a feature article. Older people are "desexualized" by our culture when, in fact, they remain sexual beings. -- Dr. Bill Thomas

Social Media

AARP Gets Social

One of America's largest and most influential membership organizations -- AARP -- is going social. Normally, I'd advise against trying to reinvent the social networking wheel when a juggernaut like Facebook is pushing 500 million users. But AARP takes the plunge by launching the AARP Online Community. -- Kavan Peterson

Longevity

Old Men Playing Games

"Lose, and the Celtics are too old. Win, and they are an experienced team." "Old age" is a relative term. Old age for pro-basketball players starts at thirty. Thirty is very young for a novelist. Old age is not an absolute concept because age cannot be understood without reference to society, culture and environment. -- Dr. Bill Thomas

Elderhood

Playing Out-- For the First Time

Here is the thing. I have spoken in front of crowds as large as 7,000 people. I have given speeches on four continents. I am very comfortable on stage and in public. Playing music in front of an audience for the first time is a different thing. It is new. It is scary.

Aging

The Peace of the Bonobos

The more we learn, the narrower the gap between human brains and animal brains becomes. -- Dr. Bill Thomas

Power-Up Friday: Murder on the Where??

NPR ran a story Tuesday about research examining possible correlations between word density in younger writings and later risks for dementia. Fascinating stuff. -- Dr. All Power

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