Honolulu man in theft and forgery case arrested in New York - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Honolulu man in theft and forgery case arrested in New York

Nigel Salmingo Nigel Salmingo
Christopher Van Marter Christopher Van Marter

By Jim Mendoza - bio | email

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - Authorities accuse Nigel Salmingo of using his position as office manager of a downtown law firm to steal money from his employer.

A 17-page indictment details 37 counts of alleged crimes including theft, forgery and money laundering.

"Within thirty days of being hired he began a number of fraud schemes targeting the law firm," deputy prosecutor Christopher Van Marter said.

From 2007 to 2009 Salmingo worked for Winer, Meheula and Devens.

He's accused of forging company checks to pay personal debts, using the law firm's credit cards, and stealing from the petty cash fund to buy a BMW, computers, Ipods and electronics.

"Over the course of eighteen months he stole approximately $300,000 from the law firm," Van Marter said.

His employers discovered irregularities in the firm's checking and charge accounts while Salmingo was on vacation.

"They asked him to come in and turn in his keys and other work-related items and he never showed up," Van Marter said.

Salmingo lived in an apartment building on Punahou street. Court papers said the facts suggest that he fled the state soon after his alleged crimes were discovered.

The U.S. Postal Service tracked him to New Jersey then New York. He was arrested Thursday in Manhattan.

"We though we could trust Mr. Salmingo but we were wrong.  It just goes to show that this can happen to anyone, especially where the criminal is willing to go to great lengths to deceptively conceal his theft," Bill Meheula said in a written statement.

Salmingo is being extradited back to Honolulu.

Copyright 2010 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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