Driver in deadly 2006 Mokuleia crash guilty of negligent homicide - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Driver in deadly 2006 Mokuleia crash guilty of negligent homicide

Keanan Tantog Keanan Tantog
Cathy Hookala Cathy Hookala
Johanna Ramos Johanna Ramos

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - A verdict in the case of a man accused of a drunken speeding crash that killed a friend. Keanan Tantog waived his right to a jury trial.

Friday a judge declared him guilty of negligent homicide and negligent injury.

But he escaped the charge of manslaughter for the accident in Mokuleia three years ago.

Prosecutors say Tantog was 18 and racing friends when his car flipped several times, killing passenger Bobby Gouveia. But the judge says there wasn't evidence to prove there was a race.

"I feel very sorry for the loss of a friend, a good friend. Our prayers go out to his family as they begin to heal and closure can begin.  said Cathy Hookala, Tantog's mother-in-law.

 "I feel this justice system sucks big time. This other guy in the car make like my son didn't mean nothing. I really want him to serve 18 years of my sons life, I raised him for 18 years you know, it's hard" said Johanna Ramos, Gouveia's mother.

Manslaughter could carry a maximum of 25 years. Instead Tantog faces a 15 year sentence when sentenced in July.

Copyright 2010 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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