Pearl Harbor bike path cleanup on Saturday - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Pearl Harbor bike path cleanup on Saturday

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - The fourth-annual Pearl Harbor Bike Path Cleanup is organized annually by the City's Storm Water Quality Branch. It is scheduled for Saturday, April 17, from 8 AM to 11 AM in honor of Earth Month.  The cleanup is a large-scale effort to remove rubbish and debris along the 13.5 miles of bike path stretching from Aiea to Waipahu.

During last year's cleanup, nearly 300 volunteers from 30 agencies dedicated two hours to help clean the bike path. Volunteers collected more than 2,000 pounds of burnable trash, and they also separated out recyclable materials.  Some of the most unusual items volunteers have found include bulky car parts and toilet seats.

This area at the Waipahu end of the bike path is one of 11 sites where volunteers will help remove litter and debris along the bike path on Saturday. This area of Kapakahi Stream faces several challenges, including illegal rubbish dumping, adequate stream flow due to overgrowth of invasive plant species and potential industrial pollutants.

This year, volunteers will also be planting 40 trays aeae, 20 pots of Hawaiian puukaa sedge in the area. This helps replenish the native plant population and reduce sediment runoff. Kapakahi Stream is a spring-fed stream that flows from its headwaters at Hawaii Plantation Village to West Loch of Pearl Harbor. The Kapakahi Stream watershed encompasses 280 acres. The Kapakahi Stream is right next door to the Pouhala Marsh, which is home to the endangered Hawaiian Coot and the Stilt. The 70-acre Pouhala Marsh is the largest of the remaining wetlands in Pearl Harbor.

Get involved: Visit www.cleanwaterhonolulu.com for more information on how to participate in this event and help keep our streams and storm drains clean.

Help keep our streams and storm drains clean, and follow these tips:

Don't put anything down the storm drains or into streams – they run to the ocean.
Keep sidewalks, curbs and gutters in front of your property clean.
Keep debris and soil from leaving your property.

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