Expert gives insight on missing kayak fisherman - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Expert gives insight on missing kayak fisherman

Isaac Brumaghim Isaac Brumaghim
Russell Yoshida Russell Yoshida

By Mari-Ela David - bio | email

OAHU (HawaiiNewsNow) - There are questions on how a waterman as experienced as 53-year-old Russell Yoshida could get into trouble.

An expert kayak fisherman gives some insight.

Isaac Brumaghim says this sport is dangerous - so dangerous, he keeps the area where he kayak fishes a secret so others don't follow.

He was reeled into the sport seven years ago.

Today, Brumaghim is known as one of Hawaii's top kayak fishermen, as featured on OC16's show, 'Hawaii Goes Fishing'. He makes it look easy, but -

"It's very dangerous. A lot of conditions that people have to be aware of. The ocean is an incredible beast and it can change its ways any moment," Brumaghim said.

Changes in winds, currents, and waves that Brumughim says, Yoshida possibly ran into on Oahu's North Shore on Monday.

"Haleiwa is known for big surf, especially in the winter and the winds were up this weekend, so a lot of things play a part in that. I'd say Haleiwa is definitely not a beginner's area," said Brumaghim.

Brumaghim is one of the founders of Aquahunters, a club dedicated to teaching the tight-knit community of kayak anglers about safety.

"For me personally, I feel like, shucks, I wish I could've gotten or maybe Aquahunters could have gotten more education to this guy before this situation came up," said Brumaghim.

His two top recommendations - Brumaghim says use safety gear and a buddy system at all times.

"Even for experts?"

"Oh yeah, definitely, it's never recommended to be out there {alone}, first of all, you may need to be rescued and it's always good to have somebody out there," said Brumaghim.

And though Brumaghim says he nor other members of the Aquahunters team know Yoshida -

"We're a family and anytime you hear a family member is in trouble, it really takes a toll on everybody. And we just really want to see that he come in safe," he said.

Brumaghim says kayak anglers should always wear a life vest, not just carry it on their kayak. He also says not to rely on a cell phone, instead, have a VHF radio handy.

And always have a paddle tether, so in case you flip over, your paddle doesn't separate from the kayak the way Yoshida's did.

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