Conference highlights Project HOPE program for drug offenders - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Conference highlights Project HOPE program for drug offenders

HONOLULU (HAWAIINEWSNOW) - Project HOPE is a program launched by Circuit Court judge Steven Alm to reduce probation violations by drug offenders. This week it will be the subject of a special conference addressing the treatment of substance abuse. But how effective is it? Judge Alm and conference founder Dr. Larry Schlesinger join us this morning.


 

Project HOPE/Disruptive Physician Conference

Friday November 13, 2009

Queen's Conference Center

Registration: www.hopeprobation.org

or call (808) 585-8160


 

Nationally and internationally-known experts on the legal and medical aspects of alcohol and drug abuse will convene in Honolulu November 13th for the 3rd annual "Project HOPE/Disruptive Physician Conference", sponsored by Pu'ulu Lapa'au - Hawaii Physicians Health Program, at the Queen's Medical Center Conference Center, 510 S. Beretania Street. The conference runs from 9:30am to 5:00pm and all interested community members are invited to participate.

 

 

The first two "Disruptive Physician Conferences" addressed this emerging field, which overlaps the treatment of substance abuse and behavioral disorders with hospital management and administration. All of Hawaii's hospitals have recently drafted and are implementing guidelines and rules for handling disruptive physicians. "Disruptive physicians" are those who exhibit behavior that can be defined as a style of interaction between themselves, hospital personnel, patients, family members or others that interferes with, or could potentially interfere with, patient care. Disruptive behavior and its causes can be as varied as substance abuse (alcohol, drugs, or certain prescription medication), anger issues, intimidation, profane language, or even threatening verbal exchanges.

"We've had two years of successfully exploring this issue with our local hospitals and doctors," said conference founder and moderator Dr. S. Larry Schlesinger, "and this year we've broadened the conference to include one of the most exciting and impressive programs ever to come out of Hawaii, Judge Steven Alm's Project HOPE."

Project HOPE (Hawaii's Opportunity Probation with Enforcement) is a program of the Hawaii Circuit Court, conceived and operated by Circuit Judge Steven S. Alm. It was the recent subject of a groundbreaking study published by University of California, Los Angeles Public Policy Professor Mark A. R. Kleiman, who called the program "unmatched" as a drug treatment and recidivism (repeat offender) reduction program.

Dr. Robert DuPont, a nationally-known medical and forensic expert, and former Presidential Drug Czar; Canada's Dr. Michael Kaufmann, internationally-known expert/author on the disruptive physician; and Dr. Kevin Kunz, a Kona physician and the current national President of the American Board of Addiction Medicine, will attend and present at the all-day conference on Friday, November 13, 2009. Information about the conference, including Conference Agenda, Presenters, Schedule, and Registration, is available at www.hopeprobation.org. The conference is open to the public and there is no fee to attend but advance registration is required. Conference sponsor Pu'ulu Lapa'au - Hawaii Physicians Health Program is covering all costs for the conference as a public service.

The History of HOPE Probation

In 2004, First Circuit Judge Steven Alm launched a pilot program to reduce probation violations by drug offenders and others at high risk of recidivism. This high-intensity supervision program, called HOPE Probation (Hawaii's Opportunity Probation with Enforcement), is the first and only of its kind in the nation. Probationers in HOPE Probation receive swift, predictable, and immediate sanctions - typically resulting in several days in jail - for each detected violation, such as detected drug use or missed appointments with a probation officer.

How HOPE Works

In HOPE Probation, defendants are clearly warned that if they violate the rules, they go to jail. Defendants are required to call a hotline each weekday morning to find out if they must take a drug test that day. Random drug testing occurs at least once a week for the first two months.

If probationers test positive, they are arrested immediately. If they fail to appear for the test or violate other terms of probation, warrants for their arrest are issued immediately. Once they are apprehended, a probation modification hearing is held two days later, and violators are typically sentenced to a short jail term. The jail time may increase for subsequent violations and repeat offenders are often ordered into residential treatment.

Program Success

Evaluation results indicate the program is highly successful at reducing drug use and crime, even among difficult populations such as methamphetamine abusers and domestic violence offenders.

Word of Hawaii's HOPE Probation has been spreading. Judge Alm has been invited to present information on the opportunities and obstacles afforded by this new approach to criminal justice policymakers, analysts and practitioners in the U.S. and abroad.

Judge Alm has developed "Benchmarks for Success" that can be used as a guide for programs who would like to use the HOPE model.

 

 

The first two "Disruptive Physician Conferences" addressed this emerging field, which overlaps the treatment of substance abuse and behavioral disorders with hospital management and administration. All of Hawaii's hospitals have recently drafted and are implementing guidelines and rules for handling disruptive physicians. "Disruptive physicians" are those who exhibit behavior that can be defined as a style of interaction between themselves, hospital personnel, patients, family members or others that interferes with, or could potentially interfere with, patient care. Disruptive behavior and its causes can be as varied as substance abuse (alcohol, drugs, or certain prescription medication), anger issues, intimidation, profane language, or even threatening verbal exchanges.

"We've had two years of successfully exploring this issue with our local hospitals and doctors," said conference founder and moderator Dr. S. Larry Schlesinger, "and this year we've broadened the conference to include one of the most exciting and impressive programs ever to come out of Hawaii, Judge Steven Alm's Project HOPE."

Project HOPE (Hawaii's Opportunity Probation with Enforcement) is a program of the Hawaii Circuit Court, conceived and operated by Circuit Judge Steven S. Alm. It was the recent subject of a groundbreaking study published by University of California, Los Angeles Public Policy Professor Mark A. R. Kleiman, who called the program "unmatched" as a drug treatment and recidivism (repeat offender) reduction program.

Dr. Robert DuPont, a nationally-known medical and forensic expert, and former Presidential Drug Czar; Canada's Dr. Michael Kaufmann, internationally-known expert/author on the disruptive physician; and Dr. Kevin Kunz, a Kona physician and the current national President of the American Board of Addiction Medicine, will attend and present at the all-day conference on Friday, November 13, 2009. Information about the conference, including Conference Agenda, Presenters, Schedule, and Registration, is available at www.hopeprobation.org. The conference is open to the public and there is no fee to attend but advance registration is required. Conference sponsor Pu'ulu Lapa'au - Hawaii Physicians Health Program is covering all costs for the conference as a public service.

The History of HOPE Probation

In 2004, First Circuit Judge Steven Alm launched a pilot program to reduce probation violations by drug offenders and others at high risk of recidivism. This high-intensity supervision program, called HOPE Probation (Hawaii's Opportunity Probation with Enforcement), is the first and only of its kind in the nation. Probationers in HOPE Probation receive swift, predictable, and immediate sanctions - typically resulting in several days in jail - for each detected violation, such as detected drug use or missed appointments with a probation officer.

How HOPE Works

In HOPE Probation, defendants are clearly warned that if they violate the rules, they go to jail. Defendants are required to call a hotline each weekday morning to find out if they must take a drug test that day. Random drug testing occurs at least once a week for the first two months.

If probationers test positive, they are arrested immediately. If they fail to appear for the test or violate other terms of probation, warrants for their arrest are issued immediately. Once they are apprehended, a probation modification hearing is held two days later, and violators are typically sentenced to a short jail term. The jail time may increase for subsequent violations and repeat offenders are often ordered into residential treatment.

Program Success

Evaluation results indicate the program is highly successful at reducing drug use and crime, even among difficult populations such as methamphetamine abusers and domestic violence offenders.

Word of Hawaii's HOPE Probation has been spreading. Judge Alm has been invited to present information on the opportunities and obstacles afforded by this new approach to criminal justice policymakers, analysts and practitioners in the U.S. and abroad.

Judge Alm has developed "Benchmarks for Success" that can be used as a guide for programs who would like to use the HOPE model.

The first two "Disruptive Physician Conferences" addressed this emerging field, which overlaps the treatment of substance abuse and behavioral disorders with hospital management and administration. All of Hawaii's hospitals have recently drafted and are implementing guidelines and rules for handling disruptive physicians. "Disruptive physicians" are those who exhibit behavior that can be defined as a style of interaction between themselves, hospital personnel, patients, family members or others that interferes with, or could potentially interfere with, patient care. Disruptive behavior and its causes can be as varied as substance abuse (alcohol, drugs, or certain prescription medication), anger issues, intimidation, profane language, or even threatening verbal exchanges.

"We've had two years of successfully exploring this issue with our local hospitals and doctors," said conference founder and moderator Dr. S. Larry Schlesinger, "and this year we've broadened the conference to include one of the most exciting and impressive programs ever to come out of Hawaii, Judge Steven Alm's Project HOPE."

Project HOPE (Hawaii's Opportunity Probation with Enforcement) is a program of the Hawaii Circuit Court, conceived and operated by Circuit Judge Steven S. Alm. It was the recent subject of a groundbreaking study published by University of California, Los Angeles Public Policy Professor Mark A. R. Kleiman, who called the program "unmatched" as a drug treatment and recidivism (repeat offender) reduction program.

Dr. Robert DuPont, a nationally-known medical and forensic expert, and former Presidential Drug Czar; Canada's Dr. Michael Kaufmann, internationally-known expert/author on the disruptive physician; and Dr. Kevin Kunz, a Kona physician and the current national President of the American Board of Addiction Medicine, will attend and present at the all-day conference on Friday, November 13, 2009. Information about the conference, including Conference Agenda, Presenters, Schedule, and Registration, is available at www.hopeprobation.org. The conference is open to the public and there is no fee to attend but advance registration is required. Conference sponsor Pu'ulu Lapa'au - Hawaii Physicians Health Program is covering all costs for the conference as a public service.

The History of HOPE Probation

In 2004, First Circuit Judge Steven Alm launched a pilot program to reduce probation violations by drug offenders and others at high risk of recidivism. This high-intensity supervision program, called HOPE Probation (Hawaii's Opportunity Probation with Enforcement), is the first and only of its kind in the nation. Probationers in HOPE Probation receive swift, predictable, and immediate sanctions - typically resulting in several days in jail - for each detected violation, such as detected drug use or missed appointments with a probation officer.

How HOPE Works

In HOPE Probation, defendants are clearly warned that if they violate the rules, they go to jail. Defendants are required to call a hotline each weekday morning to find out if they must take a drug test that day. Random drug testing occurs at least once a week for the first two months.

If probationers test positive, they are arrested immediately. If they fail to appear for the test or violate other terms of probation, warrants for their arrest are issued immediately. Once they are apprehended, a probation modification hearing is held two days later, and violators are typically sentenced to a short jail term. The jail time may increase for subsequent violations and repeat offenders are often ordered into residential treatment.

Program Success

Evaluation results indicate the program is highly successful at reducing drug use and crime, even among difficult populations such as methamphetamine abusers and domestic violence offenders.

Word of Hawaii's HOPE Probation has been spreading. Judge Alm has been invited to present information on the opportunities and obstacles afforded by this new approach to criminal justice policymakers, analysts and practitioners in the U.S. and abroad.

Judge Alm has developed "Benchmarks for Success" that can be used as a guide for programs who would like to use the HOPE model.

 

 

 

 

 

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