State Spends Big To Aid Homeless - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

State Spends Big To Aid Homeless

Homeless shelter recently opened by the state at Kakaako. Homeless shelter recently opened by the state at Kakaako.

(KHNL) - Hawaii's homeless are receiving a helping hand.

Governor Linda Lingle signed three bills, which puts more money on the front lines of the battle against homelessness.

More than $40 million will go towards helping the homeless, representing a 400% increase in such funding.

"There are homeless everywhere here on Oahu. There's nowhere you can drive, hardly any neighborhood where you're not going to see homeless people," said Lingle.

A large part of the money, $31 million, will go towards building more affordable housing.

"We have got to produce results. We can't spend all this money and people see the same situation exist a year or two or three years from now," said Gov. Lingle.

The bills will also give grants to some service providers. It will give Utu Langi's group, H-5, the funds needed to turn old tour buses into mobile shelters.

"I feel so blessed to receive the funding from the state and be able to do a little bit more," said Langi.

The neighbor islands are also receiving help. Each county will get $400,000 for temporary emergency shelters for the homeless.

The Governor is also allowing the state to lease public lands to non-profit groups for as little as $1 a year.

In exchange, the land must be used to build affordable housing.

Gov. Lingle knows the bills won't end homelessness, but she's hoping it will give residents the help they need.

  • Hawaii News Now headlinesNewsMore>>

  • UN: Excessive drinking killed over 3 million people in 2016

    UN: Excessive drinking killed over 3 million people in 2016

    Saturday, September 22 2018 2:20 PM EDT2018-09-22 18:20:51 GMT
    Tuesday, September 25 2018 11:34 AM EDT2018-09-25 15:34:24 GMT
    (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan, FILE). FILE- In this Nov. 27, 2012 file photo, a customer checks bottles of imported wine at a supermarket in Beijing. The World Health Organization said in a report published Friday Sept. 21, 2018,  that drinking too much ...(AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan, FILE). FILE- In this Nov. 27, 2012 file photo, a customer checks bottles of imported wine at a supermarket in Beijing. The World Health Organization said in a report published Friday Sept. 21, 2018, that drinking too much ...
    The World Health Organization says that drinking too much alcohol killed more than 3 million people in 2016, mostly men.More >>
    The World Health Organization says that drinking too much alcohol killed more than 3 million people in 2016, mostly men.More >>
  • Critical crash closes Kamehameha Highway in Waiahole

    Critical crash closes Kamehameha Highway in Waiahole

    Tuesday, September 25 2018 11:11 AM EDT2018-09-25 15:11:59 GMT
    (Image: Hawaii News Now)(Image: Hawaii News Now)
    (Image: Hawaii News Now)(Image: Hawaii News Now)
    Kamehameha Highway is closed in both directions at Waiahole Homestead Road, the state Department of Transportation said. Authorities are responding to a critical crash involving a pedestrian. This story will be updated. Copyright 2018 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.More >>
    Kamehameha Highway is closed in both directions at Waiahole Homestead Road, the state Department of Transportation said. Authorities are responding to a critical crash involving a pedestrian. This story will be updated. Copyright 2018 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.More >>
  • Bye bye bugs? Scientists fear non-pest insects are declining

    Bye bye bugs? Scientists fear non-pest insects are declining

    Thursday, September 20 2018 1:19 AM EDT2018-09-20 05:19:36 GMT
    Tuesday, September 25 2018 10:45 AM EDT2018-09-25 14:45:54 GMT
    (AP Photo/Don Ryan). FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States a...(AP Photo/Don Ryan). FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States a...

    Scientists are noticing fewer and fewer moths, ladybugs, fireflies and butterflies, but they can't quite quantify what's happening to flying insects because they never measured how many bugs there used to be.

    More >>

    Scientists are noticing fewer and fewer moths, ladybugs, fireflies and butterflies, but they can't quite quantify what's happening to flying insects because they never measured how many bugs there used to be.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly