Budget Woes Put Rare Waimea Plants In Peril - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

May 10, 2002

Budget Woes Put Rare Waimea Plants In Peril

Waimea Valley is home to thousands of plant species. The Waimea arboretum foundation tries to keep the rare and endangered ones alive. But with little money, the foundation has been forced to lay-off four people this month.

The director of the Waimea Arboretum Botanical gardens says, this is one of the plants the foundation would like to see survive. But the foundation's work is now in jeopardy, after its four remaining workers were laid off.

"We've been waiting and waiting for a keiki to appear. And here, it finally has."

David Orr cares for plants like they're his children. "We're part of a process that is reversing the general trend in the world of things just slipping away."

As head of the Waimea Arboretum Botanical Gardens, he helps rare and endangered plant species survive. What he couldn't save, his job and three others.

"You're here voluntarily. Why do that? Oh, because, I mean, money is the least of the rewards that you get working here. Just the fact, I mean, it's an honor to be with a lot of these plants," says Orr.

The nursery is located at Waimea Falls Park. The Arboretum Foundation wants the city-owned property to do more to support the research. But manager Ray Greene says, the park employs a staff to maintain all 36 gardens, and provides the infrastructure the arboretum needs.

"Currently, we provide for their library, their office trailer, their nursery, their education center. We help them with insurance," says Greene.

Some in the community have criticized park management for what they call environmentally-destructive practices, such as offering visitors, at one time, all-terrain vehicles to ride in.

"We no longer offer all-terrain vehicles. We are trying to offer products that are thematically appropriate to the valley."

Orr simply wants enough funding to continue planting the seeds for the program's future.

"We're doing pioneering propagation work here. We're growing things that used to be abundant in nature. And now, they're not."

Orr says, the work can continue on a budget of about seven-thousand dollars a month. The foundation is now seeking donations from the community.

  • Hawaii News Now headlinesNewsMore>>

  • Italy hunts for blame in bridge collapse that killed 39

    Italy hunts for blame in bridge collapse that killed 39

    Wednesday, August 15 2018 3:26 AM EDT2018-08-15 07:26:11 GMT
    Thursday, August 16 2018 1:49 AM EDT2018-08-16 05:49:17 GMT
    (Vigili Del Fuoco via AP). In this photo released by the Italian firefighters, rescue teams work among the rubble of the collapsed Morando highway bridge in Genoa, northern Italy, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018. A bridge on a main highway linking Italy with Fr...(Vigili Del Fuoco via AP). In this photo released by the Italian firefighters, rescue teams work among the rubble of the collapsed Morando highway bridge in Genoa, northern Italy, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018. A bridge on a main highway linking Italy with Fr...

    Rescue and recovery efforts continued through the night into the morning in Italy following the collapse of a highway bridge in Genoa, while authorities raised the death toll to 35 with three missing.

    More >>

    Rescue and recovery efforts continued through the night into the morning in Italy following the collapse of a highway bridge in Genoa, while authorities raised the death toll to 35 with three missing.

    More >>
  • Hawaii victim of 'predator priest' says abuse left her 'damaged'

    Hawaii victim of 'predator priest' says abuse left her 'damaged'

    Thursday, August 16 2018 1:46 AM EDT2018-08-16 05:46:19 GMT
    Photo of Father Hannon. (Image: HNN)Photo of Father Hannon. (Image: HNN)

    Lynne Jensen Andres was shocked Tuesday when she read her story in the landmark Pennsylvania grand jury reported concerning priest sex abuse.

    More >>

    Lynne Jensen Andres was shocked Tuesday when she read her story in the landmark Pennsylvania grand jury reported concerning priest sex abuse.

    More >>
  • WWII POWs buried as unknowns in Hawaii get memorial marker

    WWII POWs buried as unknowns in Hawaii get memorial marker

    Wednesday, August 15 2018 2:20 AM EDT2018-08-15 06:20:27 GMT
    Thursday, August 16 2018 1:28 AM EDT2018-08-16 05:28:13 GMT
    (AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy). In this Monday Aug. 13, 2018, photo, Daniel Crowley, a 96-year-old U.S. Army Air Corps veteran from World War II who was held by Japan as a prisoner of war in the Philippines and Japan, speaks during an interview in Honolulu. ...(AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy). In this Monday Aug. 13, 2018, photo, Daniel Crowley, a 96-year-old U.S. Army Air Corps veteran from World War II who was held by Japan as a prisoner of war in the Philippines and Japan, speaks during an interview in Honolulu. ...
    A 96-year-old former U.S. Army veteran who was held prisoner by Japan during World War II will help dedicate a memorial stone to other prisoners of war at a national cemetery in Honolulu.More >>
    A 96-year-old former U.S. Army veteran who was held prisoner by Japan during World War II will help dedicate a memorial stone to other prisoners of war at a national cemetery in Honolulu.More >>
Powered by Frankly